CIVIC VIRTUE's Grand Tour Blog

gijs:

I found white turf

Civic Virtue visits the Niedersachsenstein, a somewhat uncomfortable monument to soldiers, eagles and friendship.

Civic Virtue visits the Niedersachsenstein, a somewhat uncomfortable monument to soldiers, eagles and friendship.

gijs:

Civic Virtue attempts to enter Leberecht Migge’s experiment in self-sufficiency, der Sonnenhof in Worpswede. http://de.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonnenhof_(Projekt)

Peat research in Worpswede.
More peat research at: http://civicvirtue.info/weblog/?p=2038

Peat research in Worpswede.

More peat research at: http://civicvirtue.info/weblog/?p=2038

gijs:

The Fritz Mackensen Oak.

gijs:

The Fritz Mackensen Oak.

Building a Turf Loom.

Civic Virtue building a Turf Loom.

Tree-hugging in Worpswede:
The “Fritz Mackensen Oak” in Worpswede is about 350 years old.

Tree-hugging in Worpswede:

The “Fritz Mackensen Oak” in Worpswede is about 350 years old.

Worpswede.

(Source: thruda)

gijs:

In August and September, CIVIC VIRTUE will visit Worpswede. http://archive.org/stream/worpswedefritzma00rilkuoft#page/n7/mode/thumb

gijs:

In August and September, CIVIC VIRTUE will visit Worpswede. http://archive.org/stream/worpswedefritzma00rilkuoft#page/n7/mode/thumb

arthuntermag:

Civic Virtue at W139, Amsterdam

«As a collective, CIVIC VIRTUE formed in 2010 around a shared interest in social communities, their organizational structures, and their symbols of power and virtue. Its core members Geirthrudur Finnbogadottir Hjorvar, Ruchama Noorda, Gijsbert Wouter Wahl, and Brian McKenna, draw upon the continually re-emerging symbolism and allegories of specific historicopolitical moments for rumination and recuperation of the call to virtue in contemporary society»

23 February - March 30 2013

http://live.w139.nl/en/

(via notinmybackyardfundamentals)

cartophile:

A fantastic and unrecorded metaphor map of the United States
Author:  A. F. McKay (mapmaker) / Land & River Improvement Co. (publisher?) / Rand, McNally & Co. (printer)
Title:  THE MAN OF COMMERCE / A CHART SHOWING The resemblance between the arteries of commerce, as represented by railroads, and the arterial system of man; also, the resemblance between the great vital organs of man and the commercial system of the great lakes.
Published:  Superior, WI, 1889
Description:  Lithograph, 31.75”h x 50.25”w plus margins, full printed color.  Backed with modern linen and mounted on original rollers.  
Condition:  Few minor areas of discoloration and some small cracks, else excellent 
An amazing and extremely rare image equating the American transportation network with the form and functions of the human body.
Background
The First Treaty of La Pointe (1847) between the U.S. Government and the Chippewa tribe opened up the region south and west of Lake Superior to development.  Encouraged by the superb location at the intersection of the Great Lakes, the St. Louis River and the Northern Pacific Railway, the city of Superior, Wisconsin was established in 1854, with the intent of developing a national hub for manufacturing, shipping and transportation.  This vision was interrupted by the Panic of 1857 and the Civil War, however, and the city languished until one General John Henry Hammond saw the area’s potential
Hammond purchased a large trace of land in the western end of Superior, WI in 1886; organized the Land & River Improvement Company; and established a rail line with its headquarters in the town.  The Company set about creating what a “business-friendly environment,” giving rights-of-way to major rail roads and developing the infrastructure to support large industries and a major transportation hub.  Hammond’s vision seems to have been realized: by 1900 the population of Superior reached 31,000, and in 1930 it was 46,000, though it has since declined.  [Background adapted from Wikipedia and from J.H. Beers & Co., Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Lakes Region (Chicago: 1905), pp. 4-5.]
The Man of Commerce
This mapappears to have been issued as part of a broader effort to promote the advantages of Superior as a manufacturing and transportation hub.  The image consists of an outline map of North America, over which is superimposed a cutaway diagram of the human body.  Major bones, muscles, organs and nerves are named, with many identified with specific regions:  For example, the Lake Michigan region is equated with the liver; Lakes Huron, Erie and Ontario the colon; New York the “umbilicus;” James Bay the spleen; the Gulf of St. Lawrence the rectum[!]; and “West Superior becomes the center of the cardiac or heart circulation.”  In a nice touch, the sciatic nerve is identified with the trans-Atlantic cable.  Completing the metaphor, the major arteries of the human circulatory system are laid out, with each equated to one of the nation’s major rail lines and many converging on the “heart” at Superior. 
Use of the human body as a cartographic metaphor reaches back at least as far as the 16th century, to the anthropomorphic map of Europe as a queen in Sebastian Munster’s Cosmography (1570).  However, this is by far the most detailed application of the metaphor encountered by this writer, and possibly the first time the metaphor was applied to North America.
The map is extraordinarily rare.  We have located no other examples and no mention of it in the cartographic literature, and it does not appear to be present (or mentioned) in the archive of the Rand McNally Company at the Newberry Library.
References
Not in Antique Map Price Record, OCLC, Newberry Library Cartographic Catalog, Phillips, or Rumsey.  A Google search yields no information.  One example located in a private collection.
Currently held in The American Geographical Society Library, UW-Milwaukee Libraries, Milwaukee, WI

cartophile:

A fantastic and unrecorded metaphor map of the United States

Author:  A. F. McKay (mapmaker) / Land & River Improvement Co. (publisher?) / Rand, McNally & Co. (printer)

Title:  THE MAN OF COMMERCE / A CHART SHOWING The resemblance between the arteries of commerce, as represented by railroads, and the arterial system of man; also, the resemblance between the great vital organs of man and the commercial system of the great lakes.

Published:  Superior, WI, 1889

Description:  Lithograph, 31.75”h x 50.25”w plus margins, full printed color.  Backed with modern linen and mounted on original rollers. 

Condition:  Few minor areas of discoloration and some small cracks, else excellent 

An amazing and extremely rare image equating the American transportation network with the form and functions of the human body.

Background

The First Treaty of La Pointe (1847) between the U.S. Government and the Chippewa tribe opened up the region south and west of Lake Superior to development.  Encouraged by the superb location at the intersection of the Great Lakes, the St. Louis River and the Northern Pacific Railway, the city of Superior, Wisconsin was established in 1854, with the intent of developing a national hub for manufacturing, shipping and transportation.  This vision was interrupted by the Panic of 1857 and the Civil War, however, and the city languished until one General John Henry Hammond saw the area’s potential

Hammond purchased a large trace of land in the western end of Superior, WI in 1886; organized the Land & River Improvement Company; and established a rail line with its headquarters in the town.  The Company set about creating what a “business-friendly environment,” giving rights-of-way to major rail roads and developing the infrastructure to support large industries and a major transportation hub.  Hammond’s vision seems to have been realized: by 1900 the population of Superior reached 31,000, and in 1930 it was 46,000, though it has since declined.  [Background adapted from Wikipedia and from J.H. Beers & Co., Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Lakes Region (Chicago: 1905), pp. 4-5.]

The Man of Commerce

This mapappears to have been issued as part of a broader effort to promote the advantages of Superior as a manufacturing and transportation hub.  The image consists of an outline map of North America, over which is superimposed a cutaway diagram of the human body.  Major bones, muscles, organs and nerves are named, with many identified with specific regions:  For example, the Lake Michigan region is equated with the liver; Lakes Huron, Erie and Ontario the colon; New York the “umbilicus;” James Bay the spleen; the Gulf of St. Lawrence the rectum[!]; and “West Superior becomes the center of the cardiac or heart circulation.”  In a nice touch, the sciatic nerve is identified with the trans-Atlantic cable.  Completing the metaphor, the major arteries of the human circulatory system are laid out, with each equated to one of the nation’s major rail lines and many converging on the “heart” at Superior. 

Use of the human body as a cartographic metaphor reaches back at least as far as the 16th century, to the anthropomorphic map of Europe as a queen in Sebastian Munster’s Cosmography (1570).  However, this is by far the most detailed application of the metaphor encountered by this writer, and possibly the first time the metaphor was applied to North America.

The map is extraordinarily rare.  We have located no other examples and no mention of it in the cartographic literature, and it does not appear to be present (or mentioned) in the archive of the Rand McNally Company at the Newberry Library.

References

Not in Antique Map Price Record, OCLC, Newberry Library Cartographic Catalog, Phillips, or Rumsey.  A Google search yields no information.  One example located in a private collection.

Currently held in The American Geographical Society Library, UW-Milwaukee Libraries, Milwaukee, WI

(via crushallhumans)

A Sunday Afternoon With CIVIC VIRTUE @ w139
Date: 15 April 2013 
Spend an edifying Sunday afternoon at W139 with CIVIC VIRTUE. Come hang out in the temple and enjoy a pastoral mixture of gin, tonic, slideshows and a soapbox performance on the occasion of the Grand Tour Exhibition Finissage.A sermon will be held at 16:00 on the subject of decapitation and the well-ordered society.

A Sunday Afternoon With CIVIC VIRTUE @ w139

Date: 15 April 2013 

Spend an edifying Sunday afternoon at W139 with CIVIC VIRTUE. Come hang out in the temple and enjoy a pastoral mixture of gin, tonic, slideshows and a soapbox performance on the occasion of the Grand Tour Exhibition Finissage.

A sermon will be held at 16:00 on the subject of decapitation and the well-ordered society.

(Source: gijs)

Publication for CIVIC VIRTUE’s Grand Tour exhibition in W139, Amsterdam, including an interview by Tim Voss with CIVIC VIRTUE and an epic poem. Design by Paul Gangloff.

(Source: gijs)

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